Archive for the ‘2014’ Category

This event has been cancelled: “The Challenges of Fulfilling Planning and Housing Expectations…”

September 15, 2014 in 2014 | Comments (0)

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The Southern California Planning Congress
regrets to inform you that this event has been cancelled. 

Current registrants will be issued refunds. 

 

The Challenges of Fulfilling

Planning and Housing

Expectations for the

City of Los Angeles

 

An Evening with Kevin Keller

 

 

LA Graphic - CH

 

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Meet and Greet at 6:30 p.m., Dinner at 7:00 p.m.

Taix French Restaurant:
1911 West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90026

Download the Event Flyer

 

 

Housing and policy direction for a city as large and diverse as Los Angeles requires focused executive and political leadership. An overarching vision must respond to varied expectations and implementation challenges.

How does Mayor Eric Garcetti view the city’s future and how does the mayor intend to use his office to fulfill a vision that improves basic city services and promotes commerce, development, employment opportunity, and meeting varied housing demands, concurrent with measures to advance stable communities across the city?

How will the proposed streamlining of Planning, Building and Safety and the City’s other development services balance efficiency with the public’s desire for more livable and sustainable neighborhoods?

 

Our guest speaker:

Kevin Keller
Director of Planning and Housing Policy,
Office of the Mayor, City of Los Angeles

 

 

DINNER MENU

Dinner entrees include fresh French baguette, Soup of the day,
Organic greens with house vinaigrette dressing, Fresh vegetable,
and Rice or potato.

 

With one of the following selections:

Coq Au Vin –
Traditional French dish of chicken cooked in a red wine sauce with mushrooms.

Fresh Boneless Trout Almondine

Pasta Monegasque –
Penne paste with tomatoes, garlic, basil and olive oil.

 

All with Sherbet and Coffee or tea.

 


REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Cost: $40 general public, $30 members, $25 for students with ID

 

This event has been cancelled. 


Registration at the event is available (via checks only), for an additional $10 and is not guaranteed.

Registration refunds or credits will not be provided.

Download the Event Flyer
(If you did not receive the event email)

 

 

Questions?
Email us at socalplanningcongress@gmail.com

Also, visit our Facebook page and click the “like” button to receive future updates as they are posted.
You can also follow us via Twitter for updates.


Event Summary – “Hollywood Central Park – A Freeway Cap Park…”

August 18, 2014 in 2014 | Comments (0)

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Southern California Planning Congress
Event Summary – July 2014

Hollywood Central Park:
A Freeway Cap Park Bridging
Divided Neighborhoods

 

 

Our guest speaker for the evening was Laurie L. Goldman, Executive Director and Founding President of Friends of the Hollywood Central Park (FHP).  Ms. Goldman presented the development concept and working model of the proposal to cap the US-101 Hollywood Freeway within the Hollywood neighborhood of Los Angeles to create a 40-acre public park.

 

Hollywood Park Event - Bob Fazio - IMG_1481

 

Bob Fazio, SCPC’s Vice President of Programs, introduced the speaker and project, giving some background on its origins in the days when the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles (CRA\LA) was still active.

Ms. Goldman then provided a history of the project and its design concept, which she reviewed through the aid of a physical model. When implemented, the project will provide 40 acres of new parkland within the Hollywood community.  Seattle’s urban park over the I-5 freeway near its downtown opened in 1976, and the Hollywood Park concept came to life the following year.

 

Hollywood Park Event - Laurie Goldman - IMG_1484

 

The CRA conducted the first feasibility study for the Hollywood Central Park in 2007, and in 2009, Friends of the Hollywood Park (FHP) was created. The New York High Line linear park was created soon after on the West Side of Manhattan on an abandoned railroad viaduct, opening in 2009 and then extended in 2011.

The local area in Hollywood is park poor.  With a population of 187,000 inhabitants, including approximately 40,000 children, the creation of new open space is needed and will raise the low amount of park acreage per capita.  Federal funding for the environmental impact report has been pursued through the offices of both former City of Los Angeles Mayor Villaragosa and current Mayor Garcetti. Construction cost has initially been estimated at close to $1 billion.

 

Hollywood Park Event - Laurie Goldman and Group 2 - IMG_1489

Hollywood Park Event - Laurie Goldman and Group - IMG_1493

 

A major challenges in developing the park is its presence over a State-owned (Caltrans) facility. FHP has worked out a coordination plan where one representative from Caltrans funnels all communication, to avoid a complicated coordination scheme where multiple Caltrans divisions are communicating in parallel with the project team but not with each other.  The County of Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) has become the assumed funding clearinghouse for many State and Federal funding streams, but this project is unique and an atypical government-funded major infrastructure project in the area.

An additional challenge for the project is City zoning designations.  If an “open space” designation were to be used for the park, certain complementary uses that would make the park functional would be prohibited.  Special zoning for this project is being pursued to allow all planned elements.

FHP is also buying land along the edges of the park to enable development of affordable housing projects to increase much-needed new residential uses that would be complemented by the nearby park and ensure that low- and moderate-income residents would not be displaced by the project and its impact on property values.

 

Hollywood Park Event - Park Model - IMG_1498

 

We look forward to seeing this project develop.  It will provide much-needed park land in Hollywood and a viable community gathering place.

 

For more information, visit the project updates page.

 

 

 

 


Event Summary – “Our Water, Our Lifestyle – The Next Hundred Years…”

August 13, 2014 in 2014 | Comments (0)

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Southern California Planning Congress
Event Summary – May 2014

An Aqueduct Runs Through It:
A Series on the Future of
California’s Water Supply

In cooperation with the California Center for
Land and Water Stewardship, Cal Poly Pomona

 

Part 1 – Our Water, Our Lifestyle
The Next Hundred Years of
the Los Angeles Aqueduct

 

 

Barry Lehrman, MLA, MArch, ASLA is the Project Director of the Aqueduct Futures Project, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Cal Poly Pomona.  He spoke to the event guests on water issues concerning Southern California, focusing on the history of water delivery to California, the aqueduct system and its environmental hurdles, and the future of development and resources in the State.

 

 Aqueduct Futures - Prof Lehrman, Cal Poly Pomona

 

Aqueduct Futures

 

The size of the aqueduct system and the area it draws water from is astounding.  Almost 490 square miles of land is owned by the City of Los Angeles, via its Department of Water & Power, in the Owens Valley where Bishop and other communities are located.  This area is larger than the City of Los Angeles itself.

The water level of Owens Lake began noticeably and consistently dropping as early as the year 1890. The local Payutes population drew the first water in the mid-1800s.  In 1928 the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) was formed and the Colorado River Aqueduct was created.

The City of Los Angeles, from 1781 to 1940, approved 83 separate annexations of land.  Then, after 1940, 292 additional annexations were approved.  LADWP is a major landlord and natural resources manager for City property in the Owens Valley.

 

Aqueduct Futures

 

More water efficiency practices are needed, but much goes to wasteful agricultural irrigation practices. The Bureau of Reclamation does not do a beneficial job of reclaiming water.

More efficiency in water usage also translates to power savings, as up to 20 percent of power in California is used to transport water. Desalination is not the only option, as it also uses a lot of power, and it is not our way out of a water shortage. Grey water recycling would consume 10 percent of the energy of ocean desalination.

 

Aqueduct Futures

 

To help direct future use and operations of the aqueduct and the surrounding City land area, an Aqueduct Master Plan is proposed that would focus on multifunctional uses for the land and region.  The concept of ‘Aqueductsheds’ was introduced, dealing with the system much like a river watershed system. The area owned by the City of Los Angeles for the aqueduct system could be the largest city park in the World. It could be a ‘national park’ rivaling Yosemite.

 

For more information, visit the Aqueduct Futures project web site.

 

 

 

 


“Insatiable Appetites” on May 21st has been cancelled.

April 9, 2014 in 2014 | Comments (0)

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An Aqueduct Runs Through It:

A Series on the Future of

California’s Water Supply

In cooperation with the California Center for
Land and Water Stewardship, Cal Poly Pomona

 

Part 2 – Insatiable Appetites

Water, Energy, and

Managing the Flow

 

waterVpower

Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Meet and Greet at 6:30 p.m., Dinner at 7:00 p.m.

Taix French Restaurant:
1911 West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90026

Download the Event Flyer

 

 

dwpThere is nothing like a drought to focus our attention on the availability of water. Yet the connection between water and electricity usage usually goes unnoticed. Few realize that LA’s annual water consumption has been flat for 30 years while the city’s population has grown by over 1 million inhabitants, or that water management consumes 20% of the state’s electric power. What is the perspective of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the nation’s largest municipally owned public utility, given its mandate to manage water and energy resources? How does it ensure today’s water delivery and future supplies for a growing city?

 

David Jacot, LADWP
 

Our guest speaker: 

David Jacot, P.E.

Director of Efficiency Solutions,
Los Angeles Department of Water & Power

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DINNER MENU

Dinner entrees include fresh French baguette, Soup of the day,
Organic greens with house vinaigrette dressing, Fresh vegetable,
and Rice or potato.

 

With one of the following selections:

Coq au Vin –
Traditional French dish of chicken cooked in a red wine sauce with mushrooms.

Beef Bourguignon –
Tender pieces of beef in Burgundy wine mushroom sauce.

Pasta Monegasque –
Penne paste with tomatoes, garlic, basil and olive oil.

 

All with Sherbet and Coffee or tea.

 

 


REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Cost: $40 general public, $30 members, $25 for students with ID

 

** On-line registration has now closed **
This event has been cancelled.
Registrants will receive a refund via PayPal.

 

Download the Event Flyer
(If you did not receive the event email)

 

 

Questions?
Email us at socalplanningcongress@gmail.com

Also, visit our Facebook page and click the “like” button to receive future updates as they are posted.
You can also follow us via Twitter for updates.


Thanks to Rick Cole for the “The Innovative Use of Public Resources” event

February 3, 2014 in 2014 | Comments (0)

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The Southern California Planning Congress 
invites you to the following event:

 

An Evening with Rick Cole

The Innovative Use of Public Resources

 

 

Garcetti City Hall edit

 

Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Meet and Greet at 6:30 p.m., Dinner at 7:00 p.m.

Taix French Restaurant:
1911 West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90026

Download the Event Flyer

 

 

As the Deputy Mayor for Budget and Innovation for the City of Los Angeles, Rick Cole is tasked with changing the way government works in the nation’s second largest city. The former Pasadena Mayor and longtime city manager talks about the future of public service. Please join us for this inspirational event to launch 2014!

 Cole HeadShot

Our guest speaker:

Rick Cole
Deputy Mayor for Budget and Innovations,
City of Los Angeles

 

Called ‘One of Southern California’s most visionary planning thinkers’ by the Los Angeles Times, recognized by the American Society of Public Administrators and the Municipal Management Association of Southern California for municipal management excellence, Rick Cole now serves the administration of Mayor Eric Garcetti to help guide the resources of the nation’s second largest city.

 

 

DINNER MENU

Dinner entrees include fresh French baguette, Soup of the day,
Organic greens with house vinaigrette dressing, Fresh vegetable,
and Rice or potato.

 

With one of the following selections:

Coq au Vin –
Traditional French dish of chicken cooked in a red wine sauce with mushrooms.

Beef Bourguignon –
Tender pieces of beef in Burgundy wine mushroom sauce.

Pasta Monegasque –
Penne paste with tomatoes, garlic, basil and olive oil.

 

All with Sherbet and Coffee or tea.

 


REGISTRATION AND PAYMENT

Cost: $40 general public, $30 members, $25 for students with ID
** On-line registration is now closed. **

 


Registration at the event is available (via checks only), for an additional $10 and is not guaranteed.

Registration refunds or credits will not be provided.

Download the Event Flyer
(If you did not receive the event email)

 

 

Questions?
Email us at socalplanningcongress@gmail.com

Also, visit our Facebook page and click the “like” button to receive future updates as they are posted.
You can also follow us via Twitter for updates.